Royd Nursing Home & Health Care Ltd
Health FAQ
Vision Basics :

One of the best things you can do for your eyes is to have them checked by your doctor whenever you have a physical examination. If you're having trouble seeing or you've been getting frequent headaches at the end of the day, have your eyes examined by an eye specialist.
It's a good idea to have your eyes checked at least every 2 years or even more frequently if you have a family history of eye problems such as glaucoma or early cataracts.
Common Vision Problems :

Myopia, or nearsightedness, is one of the most common problems. When a person has myopia, he or she is unable to focus properly on things that are far away. Their eyes are a little longer than normal, measuring from the front of the eyeball to the back. This extra length means that light focuses in front of the retina (the part of the eye that receives images and sends them to the brain) instead of on it, and that affects vision. Glasses or contacts can easily correct this problem.

Hyperopia, or farsightedness, is another problem. People with hyperopia have trouble focusing on things close up because their eyes are too "short" from front to back. In people with hyperopia, light focuses behind the retina instead of on it, causing blurry vision. Someone with significant farsightedness will need glasses to correct his or her vision.

Another condition where the eye is differently shaped is astigmatism. Here, the eye is slanted at the front, shaped more like a football than a baseball. To be able to see well, either close up or far away, contact lenses or glasses are required.
The Healthy Heart Guide :

  • Step 1 :
  •   EAT WELL.
  •   Plenty of fruits and vegetables.
  •   Wholegrains - pasta, rice, bread, cereals.
  •   Reduce intake of butter and oil.
  •   Drink in moderation.
  •   Boil, steam, or grill foods.
  •   Avoid fried food.
  •   Check Out Time 12 Noon.
  • Step 2 :
  •   PHYSICAL ACTIVITY
  •   Aerobic exercise (30 mins atleast 5 times a week)
  •   Regular exercise- brisk walking, cycling, swimming, dancing etc
  • Step 3 :
  •   RELAX
  •   Exercise/Yoga
  •   Time management
  • Step 4 :
  •   BLOOD PRESSURE
  •   Ensure blood pressure is in normal range
  •   Be physically active
  •   Avoid stress
  • Step 5 :
  •   CHECK UPS
  •   Check your weight
  •   Keep a chart of what you eat daily
  •   Family history
Diet tips for Pregnant women :

  •   Eat enough food to gain weight at the rate recommended by your doctor. Continue to eat a balanced diet even if you think you are gaining weight too quickly.
  •   Adequate amounts of vitamins, minerals and other nutrients required during pregnancy are easier to obtain when the diet is varied.
  •   Limit nutrient deficient, high kilocalorie foods. Substitute foods that have higher nutritive value.
  •   Eat meals and snacks at regular intervals. Do not skip meals. This reduces discomfort and helps you obtain the necessary nutrients.
  •   Buy foods that are labeled "enriched" or "fortified" or made of whole grain.
  •   To improve absorption of iron, include meat, poultry, fish or vitamin C-rich foods to meals.
  •   Include milk or milk products in your diet.
  •   Drink extra fluids (water is best) throughout pregnancy to help your body keep up with the increases in your blood volume. Drink at least 6 to 8 glasses of water, fruit juice, or milk each day.
  •   Take 30 milligrams of iron during your pregnancy as prescribed by your doctor to reduce the risk of anemia later in pregnancy.
  •   Caffeine, found in tea, coffee, soft drinks and chocolate, should be limited.
  •   Try to limit or avoid alcohol.
  •   Pick foods that do double duty. For example, low-fat milk, cottage cheese, and yogurt all offer servings of both calcium and protein.
  •   Broccoli provides both iron and calcium, while fresh fruits (especially those high in vitamin C) are always a good idea.
  •   Avoid empty calories. Junk food offers little or no nutritional benefit, while heaping on extra calories you don't need. Greasy or fried foods can also intensify feelings of nausea.
  •   Broccoli provides both iron and calcium, while fresh fruits (especially those high in vitamin C) are always a good ideaRemember to take a prenatal vitamin every day. Whether one prescribed by your doctor or an over the counter version, prenatal vitamins provide essential minerals like folic acid, which helps prevent certain birth defects.
  •   Vegetarians must increase protein consumption by an additional 20 percent each day. Good sources of protein include eating a variety of beans, hummus, soy products and tofu.
  •   Eating dark leafy green vegetables each day, such as spinach and broccoli will provide iron, as will nuts, seeds and some cereals. To help the body absorb iron, include citrus fruits and avoid caffeine, which will inhibit absorption. Fruits and vegetables provide important vitamins and minerals, as well as fiber to aid digestion. Choose at least three vegetables and two fruits every day.
  •   Consume 400 micrograms of folic acid daily. Good sources of folic acid are breakfast cereals fortified with the B vitamin, lentils, asparagus, spinach, orange juice, enriched breads and pasta, lettuce and broccoli.
Taking Care of Your Teeth and Mouth :

No matter what your age, you need to take care of your teeth and mouth. When your mouth is healthy, you can easily eat the foods you need for good nutrition. Smiling, talking, and laughing with others also are easier when your mouth is healthy.

 What are cavities?

Teeth are meant to last a lifetime. By taking good care of your teeth and gums, you can protect them for years to come. Tooth decay is not just a problem for children. It can happen as long as you have natural teeth in your mouth. Tooth decay, also known as cavities, ruins the enamel that covers and protects your teeth. When you don't take good care of your mouth, bacteria can cling to your teeth and form a sticky, colorless film called dental plaque. This plaque can lead to tooth decay and cavities. Gum disease can also cause your teeth to decay .

Using a fluoride toothpaste and mouth rinse can help protect your teeth. If you have a problem with cavities, your dentist or dental hygienist may give you a fluoride treatment during the office visit. The dentist also may prescribe a fluoride gel or mouth rinse for you to use at home.

 Do you know what gum diseases are?

Gum diseases (sometimes called periodontal or gingival diseases) are infections that harm the gum and bone that hold teeth in place. When plaque stays on your teeth too long, it forms a hard, harmful covering, called tartar, that brushing doesn't clean. The longer the plaque and tartar stay on your teeth, the more damage they cause. Your gums may become red, swollen, and bleed easily. This is called gingivitis.

If gingivitis is not treated, over time it can make your gums pull away from your teeth and form pockets that can get infected. This is called periodontitis. If not treated, this infection can ruin the bones, gums, and tissue that support your teeth. In time, it can cause loose teeth that your dentist may have to remove.
  • Here's how you can prevent gum disease :
  •   Here's how you can prevent gum disease.
  •   Brush your teeth twice a day (with a fluoride toothpaste).
  •   Floss once a day.
  •   Make regular visits to your dentist for a checkup and cleaning
  •   Eat a well-balanced diet.
  •   Don't use tobacco products


Knowing how to brush and floss the right way is a big part of good oral health. Gently brushing your teeth on all sides with a soft-bristle brush and fluoride toothpaste everyday is vital. Small round motions and short back-and-forth strokes work best. Take the time to brush carefully and gently along the gum line. Lightly brushing your tongue also helps.

Along with brushing, clean around your teeth with dental floss to keep your gums healthy. If brushing or flossing causes your gums to bleed or hurt your mouth, see your dentist. Use a bacteria-fighting mouth rinse to help control plaque and swollen gums.
Dealing withdentures :

Dentures (sometimes called false teeth) may feel strange at first. When you are learning to eat with them, it may be easier if you :
  •   Start with soft non-sticky food
  •   Cut your food into small pieces
  •   Chew slowly using both sides of your mouth
Dentures may make your mouth less sensitive to hot foods and liquids. They also may make it harder for you to notice harmful objects such as bones, so be careful.

Keep your dentures clean and free from food that can cause stains, bad breath, or swollen gums. Once a day, brush all surfaces with a denture care product. When you go to sleep, take your dentures out of your mouth and put them in water or a denture cleansing liquid.
What are dental implants :

Dental implants are small metal pieces placed in the jaw to hold false teeth or partial dentures in place. You need a complete dental and medical checkup to find out if implants are right for you. Your gums must be healthy and your jawbone able to support the implants. Talk to your dentist to find out if you should think about dental implants.
Suffering form dry day mouth :

Dry mouth happens when salivary glands don't work properly. This can make it hard to eat, swallow, taste, and even speak. Dry mouth also can add to the risk of tooth decay and infection. You can get dry mouth from many diseases or medical treatments, such as head and neck radiation therapy. Many common medicines also can cause dry mouth.

If you think you have dry mouth, talk with your dentist or doctor to find out why. To prevent the dryness, drink extra water. Cut back on sugary snacks, drinks that have caffeine or alcohol, and tobacco. Your dentist or doctor also might suggest that you keep your mouth wet by using artificial saliva, which you can get from most drug stores. Some people benefit from sucking hard candy.
Got oral cancer :

Oral cancer most often occurs in people over age 40. A dental check-up is a good time for your dentist to look for early signs of oral cancer. Even if you have lost all your natural teeth, you should still see your dentist for regular oral cancer exams. See your dentist or doctor if you have trouble with swelling, numbness, sores, or lumps in your mouth, or if it becomes hard for you to chew, swallow, or move your jaw or tongue. These problems could be signs of oral cancer. To lower your risk of getting oral cancer- don't smoke; don't use snuff or chew tobacco; if you drink alcohol, do so in moderation; use lip cream with sunscreen; and eat lots of fruits and vegetables.
What is chicken pox :

Chickenpox is caused by a virus called varicella zoster, which is part of the herpes virus family. It is a common illness for kids and most people get better by just resting like you do with a cold or the flu. Although it's more common in kids under the age of 15, anyone can get chickenpox. A person usually has only one episode of chickenpox in his or her lifetime. But the virus that causes chickenpox can lie dormant within the body and can cause a different type of skin eruption later in life called shingles, also referred to as herpes-zoster.

People who get the virus often develop a rash of spots that look like blisters all over their bodies. The blisters are usually small and are formed on an area of red skin. These blisters become itchy. The illness also may come along with a runny nose and cough. And the good news is that lots of kids don't get chickenpox at all, provided they take the chicken pox vaccine. Kids who do get it, if they got the shot, often get less severe cases, which means they recover faster.
What happens when you have chicken pox :

Chickenpox may begin with a cold. You might have a runny or stuffy nose, sneezing, and a cough. But 1 to 2 days later, rashes develop, often in bunches of spots on the chest and face. From there it can spread out quickly over the entire body, sometimes even in a person's ears and mouth. The number of pox is different for everyone. Some people may just get a few bumps, while others are covered from head to toe.

At first, the rash looks like pinkish dots that quickly develop into small blisters, which are filled with fluid. After about 24 to 48 hours, the fluid in the blisters gets cloudy and the blisters begin to crust over.

Chickenpox blisters show up in waves, so after some begin to crust over, a new group of spots may appear. New chickenpox usually stops appearing by the seventh day, though they may stop as early as the third day. After about a week, all the blisters should get scabs on them and start to heal. Besides the rash, someone with chickenpox might also have a stomachache, a fever, and may just not feel well.
Is it contagious ?

Chickenpox is contagious. Someone who has chickenpox is most contagious during the first 2 to 5 days that he or she is sick. That's usually about 1 to 2 days before the rash shows up. So you could be spreading around chickenpox without even knowing it!.

A person who has chickenpox can pass it to someone else by coughing or sneezing. When he or she coughs, sneezes, laughs, and even talks, tiny drops come out of the mouth and nose. These drops are full of the chickenpox virus. It's easy for someone else to breathe in these drops or get them on his or her hands.
Taking care while you have chickenpox :

Scratching the blisters can tear your skin and leave scars. Scratching can also let germs in, and the blisters could get infected.

These tips can help you feel less itchy :
  •   Keep cool because heat and sweat will make you itch more. You might want to put a cool, wet washcloth on the really bad areas.
  •   Trim your fingernails, so if you do scratch, they won't tear your skin.
  •   Soak in a lukewarm bath.
  •   Applying calamine lotion will soothe the itching.
Get a shot and avoid the Dots!

Have you had the chickenpox vaccine? You might not remember because it's often given at age 1. But you can get it when you're older, too. So go and get the chicken pox vaccine today!

Watch those calories

Food

Serving

Calories

Bread

2 slices

170

Chicken curry

1 cup

240

Chikki 

2 pieces

290

Coconut chutney 

2 tbsp

120

Coffee 

1 cup

110

Dosa 

1

125

Dry vegetable 

1 cup

150

Idli

2 pieces

150

Fish fried 

2 big pieces

220

Ghee/vanaspati 

Per ml

9.0

Keema 

6 small koftas

240

Khichdi 

1 cup

200

Milk 

per ml

0.9

Omlette 

1 egg

160

Pakora 

8 pieces

280

Papri chaat 

5 pieces

220

Paratha 

1

150

Phulka 

1

80

Plain dal 

1 cup

100

Puri 

1

100

Rice 

1 cup

170

Sambhar 

1 cup

110

Samosa 

1 piece

200

Sandesh 

2 pieces

140

Shrikhand 

1 cup

380

Skimmed milk 

Per ml

0.3

Sweet lassi 

1 glass

110

Tea 

1 cup

75

Vegetable with gravy

1 cup

170

Wheat Porridge

1 cup

220